Posted in Family games, Full length, Gaming Discussion

RallymanGT – first look

This French-designed classic went back to Kickstarter in Dec 2018 and has been a much-anticipated arrival for me. After about 3 hours (no exaggeration involved) of punching and organisation – here is a first look at the contents and an initial play through.

Here is the initial track set up and grid placements (I chose Track 31 from the official tracks because I wanted an excuse to use the sweet bridge overpass).

Mistakes: I made a few! In hindsight, I definitely ignored the overtaking rule a couple of times. Looking forward to having another go!

Posted in Resources, Solo play review

Welcome, solo board gamers

If you’ve come here looking for solo play reviews – welcome!

What We Are Playing is not limited to solo play reviews – but we’re getting a nice collection.  I love a good competitive multiplayer game . . . when I can get one.  But sometimes I (and probably you) must, or prefer to, play solo.  I played 33 different games solo in 2019, and enjoyed most of them.

Some games go really well solo; some are even a bit better in that mode; others are . . . the word ‘limp’ comes to mind 😦

Are popular games actually fun?  Are they any good solo? Will you like them? These are the questions we’re trying to answer in our What We Are Playing solo play reviews.

You can click on the ‘solo play review’ category in the top menu or side navigation to find these – or here is a current list (click any picture for the review):

Posted in Enthusiast Games, Short length, Solo play review

The Isle of Cats — solo play review

Functional “Cat Setup” included.

“Quite simply the new polyomino game standard bearer for the solo player.”

Summary:

The Isle of Cats is an Enthusiast level game of Short length.  The base game is playable by 1 to 4 players.

Here’s what we mean when we rate game ‘weight’ or level or game length.

This review focuses on the solo play experience.

The Isle of Cats has a built-in solo mode.

The best bits of this game are:

1. the marriage of simple gameplay rules with complex gameplay decisions

2. the solo game, while maintaining core gameplay elements, pushes beyond the multiplayer game to become the best iteration of The Isle of Cats

The worst bit of The Isle of Cats is the unavoidable problem when the player is subject to the mercy of random draw, particularly regarding rescuable cats.

Review:

Frank West and The Isle of Cats are certainly having their moment. And I can say it’s well-deserved as The Isle of Cats is quite simply the new polyomino game standard bearer for the solo player. It shows the potential of the genre that goes beyond “gateway” tile placement.

At its core, The Isle of Cats is a polyomino tile placement game that utilizes a round-renewing economy and a card draft system. Victory points are primarily based on placement, covering or filling different areas on the player board, as well as fulfilling optional and variable scoring objectives. The rules are straightforward and the individual player boards contain the essential information of round structure and scoring framework.

It is important to not confuse “easy to play” with “easy.” The players’ objective is much more complex than simply covering a boat with cats. There are several decision points including drafting useful cards, deciding whether to pay for them, determining initiative, and pursuing both private and public scoring objectives through tile placement.

Drafted lesson cards in a solo game.

The one minor drawback of the game is that there are times where the player is at the mercy of the dreaded draw. Whether referring to card draw or tile draw, options may be, at times, limited through no fault or choice of the player. Sometimes, the right color cat is just not available. Or the player receives a lesson card that is impossible to fulfill, especially when it comes late in the game.

The game utilizes an AI opponent, “Sister.” Like the game itself, she is elegantly designed to create a formidable foe with minimal rules overhead. She scores points based on types (color) of cats as well as her own solo-specific lessons. The twist? Both conditions are based on the player’s own tile placement.

Sister earns points for each randomly selected color of cat played (5 points for Blue, 4 for Orange, etc. revealed prior to the start of each round) and lesson cards (known from the get-go).

The solo game shines because it adds a layer of complexity that does not exist in the multiplayer game. Where the typical solo player is more likely to play a game missing an element from a multiplayer game (neighbourhood bonus in Clans of Caledonia, e.g.), The Isle of Cats adds a layer of strategy to the multiplayer game and does so in a meaningful way.

Every cat that is placed on the player’s boat simultaneously scores points for the player and the AI opponent. Many times, the placement will work toward (or against) multiple scoring objectives. Imagine: every move is a combination of both working toward one’s own objective while preventing or at least limiting the AI’s progress. I talk to myself a lot playing The Isle of Cats because there is a lot of information to process.

The core of the solo gameplay, however, largely coincides with the multiplayer mechanics. The solo game simulates the card draft, (the player will not see cards return, but she must evaluate the cards that will help best) and provides a means to compete against the AI for initiative as well as selection of cats and treasures. While not a perfect analog to multiplayer play, the limitations presented by AI interference will feel much the same for the player.

The Isle of Cats excels as a gaming puzzle beyond mere “Tetris-ing” pieces together. In its solo game iteration, The Isle of Cats requires constant evaluation of multiple scoring conditions in a satisfying mental exercise.

BoardGameGeek rates this game as 2.31 out of 5 in weight, (at the time of publication of this review), though that rating doesn’t distinguish between solo and multiplayer games and so is not adjusted to reflect the changes involved in solo play.

Availability

The Isle of Cats is available directly from the publisher, The City of Games, for £45. The Kickstarter edition is currently on sale for £65 and includes, among other things, wooden fish pieces, additional lesson card modules, and a variety of additional tiles. I have not seen The Isle of Cats at retail though I would expect one will be able to find it at outlets that carried Mr. West’s The City of Kings.

Cats have it all: admiration, an endless sleep and company only when they want it.

— Rod McKuen

Posted in Family games, Short length, Solo play review

Smiths of Winterforge – solo play review

Forge me up a silk and mithril mace with quartz highlights, will you?

Summary:

Smiths of Winterforge is a Family level game of Short + length.  It is playable by 1 to 6 players.

This review focuses on the solo play experience.

Smiths of Winterforge has a built-in solo mode with a custom deck of solo cards for variety – it is a ‘beat your own score’ mode of play. 

Here’s what we mean when we rate game ‘weight’ or level or game length.

The best bits of this game are the use of weird and wonderful materials to craft the desired items.  Fancy some birch and bronze boots?  This is the game for you 😉

img_8889
Birch and Bronze boots? Iron Reinforced breastplate with Gold and Silk highlights, held together with twine…?

Also, my version (Collector’s Edition) has some very, very sweet metal coins (call me shallow, if you wish… I will not dispute it.)¹

The worst bit of Winterforge solo is that it loses a bit of the interest and tension.  The materials in the market don’t rotate enough for real interest; there’s not enough conflict / competition and it lacks that compelling feeling which the multiplayer game has.

Review:

Smiths of Winterforge does a good job of delivering the feeling of working away in your dwarven forge.  Each contract blueprint which you take indicates how many of each type of component you need – say, one ‘base’, one ‘binder’ and one ‘decorative’ element.  At times, you’ll get a bonus for a specific component – say, +2 to forge a breastplate with bronze – but nothing forces you to use specific items.  You may think that boots would make sense with horn and hide – but birch and bronze will do the trick!  Now, what can I make with silk, twine and rubies….?

Forging has a planning element and also a luck element – the components contribute dice to a pool, and better (more expensive) components contribute dice with higher values.  If you roll your forging target number (after skill, material, and crew adjustments) then… success!  Quartz decoration will add a d6 towards forging, but (much more expensive) diamond delivers a d12 + d4.  Failure on your first attempt is not unusual – but all is not lost! If you stick to the task, each effort gains +1 by adding ‘work tokens’ until the crafting is done.

Adding the right crew, and getting the cash to fund the components is part of the mix too. Successful crafting will improve your skill  in jewellery, weapons or armour – whatever you successfully forge.  You’ll need this skill because, throughout the game, you’re working towards your royal contract, which will require a decent level of skill, the fanciest of components, and a dash of luck.

Arrr, me crew.

The deck of solo cards simulate events which occur during the limited number of rounds.  They do add variability and replayability to the game, together with the random draw of components and contracts.

Unfortunately, Smiths of Winterforge falls a little flat for me as a solo play experience – the solo cards are (in my opinion) actually better when added to the multiplayer game, to foil or enhance the plans of several competing dwarves at once.

I’m normally open-minded about ‘beat your own score’ solo games – A Feast for Odin and At the Gates of Loyang are two of my favourites, and retain a real challenge as solo games – but this method is not a great success in Smiths – the solo really needs an Automa or alternate solo challenge, in order to be a satisfying solo experience.

BoardGameGeek rates this game as 2.36 out of 5 in weight, (at the time of publication of this review), though that rating doesn’t distinguish between solo and multiplayer games and so is not adjusted to reflect the changes involved in solo play.  I consider this rating slightly overstates the complexity of the game – Smiths is a fairly simple move-and-act, collect-and-apply-resources game.  There is a modest amount of simple engine-building, and a few ways to score points (assuming you include the optional ‘laneways’ expansion which comes in the base box), but I consider it ‘lighter’ than that BGG rating.

Availability

It appears that Smiths of Winterforge has been a bit of a sales disappointment for the publisher, because it’s widely available and cheap at the moment.  It is a crazy low $29 from DungeonCrawl at the moment – it’s a lot of game, for that price.  However, I don’t recommend buying it if you only plan to play it solo – it’s much better with 3 to 5 players².

Footnotes

¹ I doubt you will get these sweet metal coins in the retail version for the current low, low price, so please check to avoid disappointment.

² Technically it plays 6, but with some special rules – I’ve tried that; stick to 5 maximum, in my opinion.

I have never found a companion that was so companionable as solitude. We are for the most part more lonely when we go abroad among men…

Henry David Thoreau

Posted in Family games, Filler length, Solo play review

Blitzkrieg! — solo play review

“[B]ecause the game plays as quickly as it does, I find myself playing multiple times in a session, happy to accept the luck, or lack thereof, in my efforts to defeat the AI bot.”

Summary:

Blitzkrieg! is a Family level game of Filler length. It is playable by 1 to 2 players.

Here’s what we mean when we rate game ‘weight’ or level or game length.

This review focuses on the solo play experience.

Blitzkrieg! has a built-in solo mode designed by David Turczi. The mode employs an AI bot that stands in for the Axis player using a selection procedure and “stratagem” tokens to make decisions.

The best bits of this game are the weighty decisions that are ever-present, in part due to the short nature of the game.

The worst bit of Blitzkrieg! is the learning curve of manipulating the AI bot. The curve is not steep, but it does require the solo player to interpret the procedure.

Review:

Paolo Mori’s Blitzkrieg! is self-described as “World War Two in 20 Minutes.” The game distills the essence of an epic event into a filler game that has become a go-to when I want a quick, but satisfying game to play.

Blitzkrieg! uses a tug-of-war mechanic with players randomly pulling unit tokens from a bag. The tokens have varying levels of strength and represent ground, naval, and air capabilities. Placement of the tokens result in gaining advantage in specific campaigns and theatres of operation as well as access to special effects.

The game is tense, even against the AI bot, because placement options are limited. I constantly evaluate what I want versus what I leave behind, especially knowing where the AI bot will prioritize placement.

Interestingly, two-player begins more or less even. The Axis player will always begin play, but the Allied player will always have the final turn and wins on a tied score. In solo, you will always play in pursuit. On Medium difficulty, the AI bot gets +6 spaces on the theatres of operation tracks when you start and based on the selection procedure, will often times be +10 to +12 before your first move.

The game is challenging. And there needs to be a willingness to accept the randomness of pulling unit tokens from a bag. But because the game plays as quickly as it does, I find myself playing multiple times in a session, happy to accept the luck, or lack thereof, in my efforts to defeat the AI bot.

I have minimal exposure to David Turczi solo modes (Teotibot in Teotihuacan: City of Gods), but I will say I have become a fan and will become interested in any project of which he is a part. AI bot offers an at-times predictable, but always challenging, opponent. Though the 2-player experience is naturally different, a victory over AI bot feels like an accomplishment.

My biggest complaint regarding the solo mode is that the AI bot relies quite heavily on a human player to make selections. The player must filter and execute the AI bot priorities. On any given turn, you must determine the theatre of operations, the campaign position (i.e., triggering special placement effects), and the individual unit choice.

My first game took nearly an hour to complete. Within a half dozen games, however, I was able to reduce game length to 20-30 minutes.

The instructions are concise, but a single-page player aid would be nice. I made a quick cut-and-paste sheet such that I use the procedure listed on the back of the solo rules together with 1) stratagem token descriptions, 2) “greatest change” breakdown, and 3) summary of AI performance of special placement effects.

BoardGameGeek rates this game as 1.73 out of 5 in weight, (at the time of publication of this review), though that rating doesn’t distinguish between solo and multiplayer games and so is not adjusted to reflect the changes involved in solo play.

Availability

I picked this title up in December from Cool Stuff Inc. for $25 USD. It appears to be out of stock in many places, and even Amazon only lists third party sellers. There is a Blitzkrieg! Nippon expansion ($15 USD) that I have yet to play, but it appears equally difficult to find as of February 2020.

It is good to be solitary, for solitude is difficult; that something is difficult must be a reason the more for us to do it.

— Rainer Maria Rilke